Tuesday, June 7, 2011

Images of Temporary Sulfur Deficiency in Corn

In a recent blog post, Dr. Murdock talked about temporary sulfur deficiency in corn. Below are some images of what we believe to be sulfur deficiency and a couple images of zinc deficiency for comparison. The two can be a bit confusing in some instances.We do not expect the sulfur deficiency symptoms in these images to lead to yield losses. Once we get rain, the symptoms should dissappear.

Suspected S deficiency. No stacking of the nodes or dark gray nodes when plants were sliced open (indicator of Zn deficiency). The symptoms are similar to minor dificiencies in Zn or even N. Field history and climate conditions suggest S as the most likely culprit. We would not expect a yield loss from this.  
Suspected S Deficiency. The symptoms are similar to minor dificiencies in Zn or even N. Field history and climate conditions suggest S as the most likely culprit. We would not expect a yield loss from this.



S defiency, or is it Zn? This corn was in a sandy spot in a field. Either S or Zn could be the culprit. The initial thought was S, but the younger leaf appears to have a small yellow band starting near the margin, making us think it might be Zn, instead. Here, tissue analysis would provide the best answer. Plants in the loamy part of the same field had no deficiency symptoms.
  
Zn Deficiency. This is a more severe deficiency where the nodes appear "stacked" on top of each other.

2 comments:

  1. The third photo could also be manganese deficiency. Or even magnesium deficiency. Usually, sulfur deficiency doesn't produce that strong of a color contrast between the veins.

    -- Matt Hagny,
    Pinnacle Crop Tech

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  2. After a bit more thinking, I doubt it's Mg def in the 3d pic -- Color isn't quite right. But it's a dead-ringer for manganese def.

    -- Matt Hagny

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